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Dog Etiquette (Read 50024 times)
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Dog Etiquette
04. Apr 2007 at 22:37
 
This was originally sent into cotford-st-luke.co.uk by a villager. It is reproduced here for information.

"Being a dog owner myself I find it both annoying and frustrating that there are many dog owners in the village who are simply ignorant or unaware of basic dog etiquette. It's not hard to follow, it's common courtesy and it makes the village and countryside a more pleasant place for people with and without dogs."
  • Clean up after your dog. If your dog fouls anywhere it is your social (and in many cases legal) responsibility to clean it up, be it in a field, on a footpath or a pavement. If your dog has been there then there is a chance that children will get there and dog faeces can not only be unpleasant on the nose when on shoes and clothing but can also cause harmful infections such as Toxocariasis. Infections spread through contact with dog faeces can have devastating effects. A 24-year-old resident from Skipsea, East Yorkshire lost the sight in his left eye after being infected by germs found in dog dirt. (Bridlington Free Press, 27 April 1995). Three year old Amy Phillips, contracted Toxocariasis leaving her blind in her left eye. (Environmental Health, July 1994).
  • When to use a lead. If your dog is off the lead and you see another dog approaching that is on the lead then you should do the same. That dog is on a lead for a reason. Either it is aggressive or being trained, you cannot expect the owner of the dog on the lead to have to control both their dog and yours. If only to prevent possible harm to your dog, keep it under control and out of the way of any dog you see on a lead.
  • When to use a lead II. Many people have phobias of dogs and many do not like to be approached by dogs. If you have a dog that is likely to go up and meet people please put it on a lead before they approach. Young children particularly can be very frightened by dogs rushing towards them. If they want to meet your dog, they can approach you.
  • Identification. You are obliged by law to ensure your dog wears a collar and tag stating your name and address (Control of Dogs Order 1992).
  • Training. Dog training is vital in any community to ensure the safety of all involved. But dog training is not just for the dog - owners too need to learn the importance of certain skills and techniques so that they can control their dogs under any circumstances.
  • People & Dogs. When meeting someone else's dog please do not encourage that dog to jump up at you. It may seem friendly but the owner should be training their dog not to jump up at people in the interests of protecting children. If you want to make a fuss, crouch down with the dog.


Our thanks to the villager who submitted this.
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Re: Dog Etiquette
Reply #1 - 04. Jul 2009 at 05:52
 
Thanks for this info/advice. Hope residents take note. I'd like to add that the by-law requiring owners to clean up after their dogs does not end when they pass out of Burge Crescent onto the path through the scrub behind Burge Farm or on the track between the farm and Tithill Lane.

Think of the children, the walkers and me on my bike and clean up after your mutt, folks!

Angry
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Re: Dog Etiquette
Reply #2 - 17. Jul 2009 at 09:17
 
The 'when to use a lead' advice above is particularly pertinent because I've recently heard of one or two cases in the village of people actually getting into fights over their dogs, and it's usually where an off-lead dog has a go at one on the lead.

If you know the person and you've previously agreed to do so, letting dogs have a go at each other off the lead is no bad thing. As long as one of the dogs is not genuinely vicious, they usually growl, snap and find out who's the alpha, often thereafter getting along peacefully (and it always looks and sounds a lot worse than it really is), but to do that it must be by mutual agreement of the owners.

If a dog is genuinely vicious it should always be kept on a lead of course (and possibly muzzled), but always put your dog on the lead if a dog owner you don't know approaches.
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Re: Dog Etiquette
Reply #3 - 17. Jul 2009 at 09:23
 
"When to use a lead. If your dog is off the lead and you see another dog approaching that is on the lead then you should do the same. That dog is on a lead for a reason. Either it is aggressive or being trained, you cannot expect the owner of the dog on the lead to have to control both their dog and yours. If only to prevent possible harm to your dog, keep it under control and out of the way of any dog you see on a lead."
This IMHO, is very important. I have a rescue dog who was badly treated by her first family, and bullied by another dog. I ALWAYS put her on a lead when near other dogs, and I wish people would do likewise. I have had other unleashed dogs approaching mine, who then reacts defensively, and the owners look at me as though it is my fault. Unbelievably stupid! Correct me if I am wrong please, but isnt it law to keep your dog on a lead in a public place anyway?
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Re: Dog Etiquette
Reply #4 - 17. Jul 2009 at 21:47
 
brooklynodog wrote on 17. Jul 2009 at 09:23:
isnt it law to keep your dog on a lead in a public place anyway?


As far as I remember the dog has to be 'under control' in a public place, which usually means on a lead but I guess there could be exceptions for extremely well-trained dogs.

I think the biggest problem is what constitutes a 'public place', which could be pretty much anywhere.

Dogs enjoy and benefit from some time off the lead in fields and such so that they can run and whatnot and sometimes there will be occasions when accidental encounters occur.

As an example, my dog is not particularly vicious and certainly never bites people although he will occasionally have a pop at another dog (not true tearing-it-apart stuff but alpha dominance stuff), so I'm always very careful to put him on the lead when I think there's any danger of bumping into anyone.

However I do let him off the lead down in the field by the railway or on other empty fields and I could be caught out if someone enters the field unnoticed by me. His recall is pretty good so it's not usually a problem but I can anticipate that one day I might get caught out. I'm not going to stop doing that though and I'd expect other dog owners to accept my apologies in the same way I've previously accepted theirs when they've been 'caught out' and their dogs have had a go at mine (yet I knew it was an open field and the owner simply hadn't seen me).
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Re: Dog Etiquette
Reply #5 - 18. Jul 2009 at 10:04
 
Hi Enq, I agree entirely about dogs being able to run free, and I enable mine to do so daily if possible.
To give you an example of what I am cross about though, we were recently in Bovey Tracey having a baguette picnic on a bench in the large park there. Our dog was happily hoovering up crumbs underneath. Luckilly she was tethered to the bench. She is a Collie† X GSD, so is not difficult to see. A yappy dog of indeterminate breed/sex came running over unprovoked or even noticed at first by our dog and proceeded to run around us in circles barking ferociously, our dog obviously responded in kind in defence, though being tethered couldnt chase. The owners could not control this mutt at all, and it eventually ran off after another dog who was also minding its own business. This dog should clearly have been on a lead as a park is a public place. If this dog needed to free run it should have been in a field somewhere.
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Re: Dog Etiquette
Reply #6 - 18. Jul 2009 at 15:13
 
Hi.aren't there plenty of nice green fields around our beautiful village were dogs can run freely without bothering other dogs or people,
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Re: Dog Etiquette
Reply #7 - 18. Jul 2009 at 20:22
 
I found myself approaching a man today, after his dog had fouled quite obviously upon the main green in the village. He was not watching his dog at all, in fact he was walking away at some considerable distance from the dog when it fouled. I approached him and politely explained where the dog had fouled and he said, What? my dog?  He made little effort to look for it, and seemed  oblivious to what his dog was doing at all. The Dogs (fouling of Land) Act states that a person in charge of a dog must remove faeces "forthwith" after a dog in their possesion has  fouled. That means immediately otherwise they risk a fixed penalty notice of £50 or a possible court fine of up to £1000. The only reasonable excuse is if that person is blind. Also, it is also a requirement to keep your dog under control whilst in a public place (see Dogs Act and Dangerous Dogs Act) so by ignoring your dog youcant really be in complete control of it, surely? I'm a dog owner by the way.
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Re: Dog Etiquette
Reply #8 - 18. Jul 2009 at 20:25
 
Oh and I forgot to mention. It is only "the law" to keep your dog on a lead in a public place if a bye-law has been passed by local council, otherwise no dogs off the lead is within the law, but i'll agree not always sensible
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Re: Dog Etiquette
Reply #9 - 18. Jul 2009 at 21:19
 
brooklynodog wrote on 18. Jul 2009 at 10:04:
Hi Enq, I agree entirely about dogs being able to run free, and I enable mine to do so daily if possible.
To give you an example of what I am cross about though, we were recently in Bovey Tracey having a baguette picnic on a bench in the large park there. Our dog was happily hoovering up crumbs underneath. Luckilly she was tethered to the bench. She is a Collie† X GSD, so is not difficult to see. A yappy dog of indeterminate breed/sex came running over unprovoked or even noticed at first by our dog and proceeded to run around us in circles barking ferociously, our dog obviously responded in kind in defence, though being tethered couldnt chase. The owners could not control this mutt at all, and it eventually ran off after another dog who was also minding its own business. This dog should clearly have been on a lead as a park is a public place. If this dog needed to free run it should have been in a field somewhere.


Yes, quite agree.

It's all about taking care, using common sense and being reasonable.

If everyone did that we wouldn't need dog wardens, by-laws and whatnot. Alas there are always some who won't take responsibility.
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Re: Dog Etiquette
Reply #10 - 18. Jul 2009 at 22:10
 
The little "yappy" dogs always seem to be much more hyper and "annoying" and have-a-go than bigger dogs (a size hang-up, perhaps?! - joking.† Cheesy ) There's a big black Lab type that lies out front of it's house in Burge Crescent taking in the evening sunshine, which just quietly watches me cycle past without so much as a curious cocked ear. I always take heed when passing dogs, led or not, in case they make a dash in front and I end up going over the handlebars but I don't even notice this one anymore. He just lies there, untethered and no bother. There's a couple of yappy dogs seem quite keen to test the puncture resistance of my tyres, though!

Little yappies always seem like the Tardis, too - bigger on the inside than out!† Wink

Always glad to see people "pooper-scooping" - although it does turn my stomach over, just the thought of it! However, the consequences of not doing so make it worth it (mess, smell, worms, blindness, stepping in it, etc.) in wider terms.

If you're not prepared responsible enough to clean up or control your dog, you shouldn't have one. Get a cat if you can't be bothered - they bury their mess and hunt for their own food!† Grin
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« Last Edit: 19. Jul 2009 at 04:50 by Tempus Fugit »  

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Re: Dog Etiquette
Reply #11 - 19. Jul 2009 at 16:57
 
Cats in Venn Close do not bury their mess-2 or 3 heaps daily on the grass ouside our house! One night I intend to sit up with a can of spray paint at the ready!
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Re: Dog Etiquette
Reply #12 - 19. Jul 2009 at 19:46
 
Henry Small made a great point.We are dog owners,who have a 19 month old Boxer who is very lively and playful,he wants to play with everybody and everything.So if we walk him around the village or on the Green we keep him on a lead,if we want to give him a run,we take him to the open fields around the village where its very quiet and he can stretch his legs,without bothering anyone.
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Re: Dog Etiquette
Reply #13 - 19. Jul 2009 at 22:09
 
pianist wrote on 19. Jul 2009 at 16:57:
Cats in Venn Close do not bury their mess-2 or 3 heaps daily on the grass ouside our house! One night I intend to sit up with a can of spray paint at the ready!
I was thinking of the habits of my own cat that I had as a young whippersnapper - but, then, there were lots of soft areas in our garden. Also, making a slightly tongue-in-cheek jibe at people who can't be bothered with their responsibilities.

My mother has similar cat problems latterly with her neighbours' cats - not the heaps so much, but the darn things disrupting her flowers in order to hide the heaps. She tried pepper dust, buckets of water, sharpened garden canes dug into the flower beds like Vietcong punji stakes - the lot. I suspect giving them a coat of Halfords finest neon pink is legally dubious, mind!

I suppose the alternative is to set aside a small, clear area of soil and hope they go for that so at least it can be managed.

I imagine modern high-rise and concrete jungle living has dinned the bury-the-package instinct out of ol' felis catus domesticus (I made that last bit up, if any GCSE Latin candidates are reading), due to the prÝvision of litter trays and the rise of "house" cats. Hmmm - evolution in action before our eyes, perhaps...?

I had occasion to be up and about in the small hours the other week and couldn't believe how noisy this village is at night. Excluding the hum from the a/c and refrigeration at the shop, and the annoying idiot screaming down Graham Way on a hornets-nest-in-a-hurry making as much noise as he could, there was a hell of a racket from badgers (never seen one of those up close before - blimey, they're BIG!), hedgehogs, rabbits, a fox and, oh my God!, how many cats on the prowl (including the stupid tabby one that thought it clever to play with a hedgehog. Still, he learned, I guess)...?!!
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Re: Dog Etiquette
Reply #14 - 10. Jan 2010 at 10:42
 
Beware the yellow snow!!

And why is it that the snow seems to have made people think their obligation to collect their dogs packages has been suspended? Or is it that the snow just makes the mess easier to see?

Given that it's the weekend and kids just want to play in and with every bit of snow they can find it would seem even more germane than usual to CLEAN UP AFTER YOUR @%$£*&!# ANIMALS! Although I'm more inclined to think that I am ascribing the term "animal" to the wrong half of the pair. Just because it's wild grass and not concrete and tarmac under the snow where your dog dumps doesn't mean you are not legally required to pick up and dispose of the package - especially as these are the areas where people are walking and taking their kids to play.

Angry
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